Lady Gaga & Tiffany’s: Legendary Style

For the past week or so we’ve all be talking about the Super Bowl. The surprising comeback by the Patriots being secondary in my circle. We talked at length about the variety of immigration spots by Anheuser-Busch & Lumber84, and the poignant equal pay pledge from Audi. We argued about whether the live spot from Snickers was really live and whether the Avocados from Mexico bit was funnier than last year (it wasn’t). Surprisingly, the one ad that we didn’t talk about was the seemingly out of place :60 spot for Tiffany & Co. staring none other than our mother monster and half-time goddess, Lady Gaga.

Immediately after the spot aired, my dad and I were texting furiously. I’ll admit, at first I was on the fence about it. My general reaction was the spot was boastful and inauthentic, but perhaps that was only because we had just seen her kill it in a solo halftime show. And I mean, really kill it. It’s dead. The halftime show is dead. Beyonce put it on life support last year (Coldplay kinda ruined everything), and Gaga finished the job. But I digress.

The point is, the more I talked about the Tiffany’s spot with people and with myself (mostly with myself), the more I realized that it is kind of perfect. If you haven’t seen it, or need a refresher, here it is. Okay so the harmonica opening was a little forced, but just hear me out.

First, let’s squash the idea that a Tiffany’s spot at the Super Bowl doesn’t really make a lot of sense. Tiffany & Co. has designed and crafted the Vince Lombardi Trophy (given to the winning team) since the inception of the game itself. So, yeah. Also, they haven’t aired a TV commercial in 20 years, so doing it on the biggest ad day of the year? Bold. Bold and badass. They’re not fuckin around.

Next, choosing Lady Gaga as the new face of their Legendary Style campaign is absolutely brilliant. She wore a dress made out of meat for Christ’s sake! If that’s not legendary style, then I have no idea what is. Combine with that the fact that Tiffany & Co. is an avid supporter (albeit quiet supporter) or marriage equality, (Don’t believe me? Here you go.) having Lady Gaga, the woman who openly and proudly sang Trans-positive lyrics to a national audience, is a huge statement for the brand and will only further their equality agenda. Smart.

Now, the script. Let us address the arrogance of the script. Aside from the fact that if this were a guy, say Mick Jagger talking about his thoughts on creativity and his process, it would feel raw and honest, but since it’s a woman speaking it’s seen as pretentious and arrogant. I could talk about that angle for years. So aside from that: The script is in fact not a script at all. It’s a beautifully edited thought stream straight from the Gaga.

It’s pretentious to talk about how creative you are. I don’t feel that way at all, I think it’s empowering and important. And I’m coming for you.

Yas. Yas Kween. It’s important to be bold, to be powerful, to be unapologetic about our creativity, our talent, our drive, our rebellion. Not only as women, but as people. It’s important to feel that we are valuable, that we can talk about our assets without being seen as arrogant. It’s important to be bold and brave and relentless. Especially now. And Tiffany is making this statement beautifully. Not only with Gaga’s words, but the execution of the spot and the jewelry itself.

What Tiffany & Co. did was inject the resistance, the rebellion, the bold youth, back into their brand. They were always something more, something special, something luxurious. But now, more than ever, it feels that they have a more acute purpose. They stand for something. Which is all I ever want from a brand.

Peace, Love & Breakfast (at Tiffany’s. Get it? eh? Whatever…)

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Lady Gaga & Tiffany’s: Legendary Style

  1. You left out the part about the authenticity of Gaga standing up for Tiffany, which you pointed out in our text exchange. My immediate reaction was that the pairing was a conflict, haughty vs. naughty; good for Tiffany, perhaps, bad for Brand Gaga. However, as you pointed out, coming from a well heeled, privileged up-bringing, her association with this high-end (-falutin?) brand is legit, even honest. (Unlike those of similar background trying to cop the “from the streets” cred.) And brutal honesty is part of the Gaga appeal. Good for her. Good for Tiffany. Great critique.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s